Elite Meets . . . Margaux from Naughty Piglets

 
 
 

At Elite Fine Wines we love trying out wine bars all around the city and one of our new favourite spots for a glass or two is the husband and wife run Naughty Piglets.

With a strong focus on low intervention wines and rave reviews flooded across the internet, we caught up with one half of the Naughty Piglets, Margaux Sharatt, to find out more.


EFW: Thanks so much for agreeing to have a chat with us! How’s 2018 treating you so far?

NP: 2018 has started really well actually! Full of life, love and plans ! (and wine).


EFW: We love that you’re a husband and wife team! Where did the idea for Naughty Piglets first come from and what’s the origin of the great name.

NP: We (Joe, my husband/ business partner and I :) were really keen to set up our own little place and found that small quirky site in Brixton, stripped everything out and made it ours! I wanted a place where wines could be talked about, drank and celebrated daily, and Joe wanted his experimental lab .. Joe always says that I am a 'greedy pig' when it comes to food and wine ... so there! It kind of became a 'philosophy' over the years though, eat, drink and be merry like a naughty piglet!


 
 

“I wanted a place where wines could be talked about, drank and celebrated daily, and Joe wanted his experimental lab.”


 
 

EFW: You have a strict focus on low intervention wines, can you explain to our readers what this means exactly?

NP: Low intervention wine essentially means that very little action is taken in the winery. Nothing is added or very little, no filtration or collage. The vigneron basically lets the wine be alive ( to an extent of course) Everything starts in the vineyards, with the understanding of the soils, the terroir and how its components interact with each other, rather than traditional farming, where they use chemicals/pesticides etc to grow quicker and bigger whilst poisoning the earth long term.

Low intervention wines are for the most, an authentic taste of the terroir. As very little is added to control the taste, the colour, it tastes kind of unique you know. Obviously this is up to each winemaker, and they all work very differently, there aren't any rules as such, mainly beliefs, understanding, and ethos.

EFW: Are there any new wine drinking trends that you’re anticipating or have already noticed?

NP: I think people are more interested and starting to care more about what they drink. I don't think the trend is changing, per se, but it is definitely evolving. Especially in massive dynamic cities such as London, people are curious, social media is huge, and food doesn't go without wine anymore, its everywhere! The idea of why would people care so much about what they eat and not about what they pour in their glass is growing and it's a good thing!!!


 
 

“The idea of why would people care so much about what they eat and not about what they pour in their glass is growing.”


 
 

EFW: Is there anything that you’d like to see change in the wine industry?

NP: I guess I'd like to see more diversity in the wine industry. Its often the same old same old everywhere you go, because of a lack of diversity and thinking outside the box maybe. It is hard to be different.


EFW: When you’re not at Naughty Piglets what other wine bars around London do you enjoy drinking at?

NP: I love to drink and eat at Brawn, Terroir, Soif, Laughing Heart, Anchor & Hope, Canton and The Dairy.